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Hollywood apprenticeships

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I grew up in Los Angeles. After I graduated from high school, like most youngsters, he had a favourite playground: it happened to be the old Warner Bros. Studio on Sunset Boulevard where my uncial worked as a production manager, I was lucky to get a part time job working as a darkroom accent for, Consolidated Film Industries in Hollywood, I had to movie to my sister’s home where I could walk to work at that time She lived at 6368 Rosewood Ave, and it took me 15mins to walk to 959 Seward Street where I worked, I worked for four years. After graduating as an electrical engineer from California Institute of Technology I obtained a position with the research team at Warner Bros. Special Effects Department on Stage 5 in Burbank. In there, film sound - multi-track tape recording technology dept. I was hired by Byron Haskin, ASC, and head of the Warner Bros. Special Effects Department on Stage 5 in Burbank. Since this was the largest such department in the movie business, I was able to work with some of the top cinematographers in the effects field, such as ASC fellows Edwin DuPar, Hans Koenekamp and Warren Lynch. When Warner Bros. purchased First National's studio in Burbank, California, I signed a contract and remained with the studio on and off for the next 40 years. In my lengthy Warner Brothers career, I pioneered numerous other sound techniques and practices that the film and television industries take for granted today, including ADR and the use of radio microphones. , magnetic tape quickly became the standard medium of audio master recording in the radio and music industries, and led to the development of the first hi-fi stereo recordings for the domestic market, the development of multi-track tape recording for music, and the demise of the disc as the primary mastering medium for sound. , magnetic tape quickly became the standard medium of audio master recording in the radio and music industries, and led to the development of the first hi-fi stereo recordings for the domestic market, the development of multi-track tape recording for music, and the demise of the disc as the primary mastering medium for sound. Magnetic tape also brought about a radical reshaping of the recording process - it made possible recordings of far longer duration and much higher fidelity than ever before, and it offered recording engineers the same exceptional plasticity that film gave to cinema editors - sounds captured on tape could now easily be manipulated sonically, edited, and combined in ways that were simply impossible with disc recordings. These experiments reached an early peak in the 1950s with the recordings of Les Paul and Mary Ford, who pioneered the use of tape editing and "multi-tracking" to create large 'virtual' ensembles of voices and instruments, constructed entirely from multiple taped recordings of their own voices and instruments. Magnetic tape fuelled a rapid and radical expansion in the sophistication of popular music and other genres, allowing composers, producers, engineers and performers to realize previously unattainable levels of complexity. Other concurrent advances in audio technology led to the introduction of a range of new consumer audio formats and devices, on both disc and tape, including the development full-frequency-range disc reproduction, the change. The company's first tape recorder, the Ampex Model 200A, was first shipped in April 1948. The first two units, serial numbers 1 and 2, were used to record the Bing Crosby Show. The American Broadcasting Company used these recorders along with 3M Scotch 111 gamma ferric oxide coated acetate tape for the first-ever U.S. delayed radio broadcast of The Bing Crosby Show. Ampex tape recorders revolutionized the radio and recording industries because of their superior audio quality and ease of operation over audio disk cutting lathes. In the same year Warner Bros. Special Effects Department on Stage 5 in Burbank. Got delivery of four units, serial numbers 3,4,5,6. During the early 1950s Ampex began marketing one- and two-track machines using 1⁄4-inch tape. The line soon expanded into three- and four-track models using 1⁄2-inch tape. In the early 1950s Ampex moved to 934 Charter St. Redwood City, California. Ampex acquired Orradio Industries in 1959, which became the Ampex Magnetic Tape Division, headquartered in Opelika, Alabama. This made Ampex a manufacturer of both recorders and tape. By the end of that decade Ampex products were much in demand by top recording studios worldwide. In 1952, movie producer Mike Todd asked Ampex to develop a high fidelity movie sound system using sound magnetically recorded on the film itself, as contrasted with the technology of the time, which used magnetic tracks on a separate film. The result of this development was the CinemaScope/Todd-AO motion picture sound system, which was first used in movies such as The Robe (1953) in 35mm and Oklahoma (1955) in 70mm (and also in 35mm). In 1960, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences awarded Ampex an Oscar for technical achievement as a result of this development. Les Paul, a friend of Crosby's and a regular guest on his shows, had already been experimenting with overdubbed recordings on disc. He received an early portable Ampex Model 200A from Crosby. He invented Sound on Sound recording using this machine. He placed an additional playback head, located before the conventional erase/record/playback heads. This allowed Paul to play along with a previously recorded track, both of which were mixed together on to a new track. 1948 Ampex Model 200A Tape Recorder The story of the 200A—the first tape recorder from Ampex—is inextricably linked to the history of the German Magnetophon. After World War II - See more at: http://www.mixonline.com/news/news-products/1948-ampex-model-200a-tape-recorder/383587#sthash.TQbm3S6i.dpuf


In 1948 he bought six acres of land in La Crescenta, CA and had an old school house moved onto the orange tree covered lot that he paid cash for. He drove the pickup for about five more years then he brought ten Clydesdales horses to work his little ranch and also to rent them to the "Rose Bowl Parade". He did that for many years until the 210 freeway came in and took five acres of his ranch for the new freeway development. He died in the late 1980's after a long struggle with Alzheimer's he was in his late eighties. I remember as a kid all of his great stories of early Hollywood, and how he would always tell people "I only take cash, no checks, and no credit cards!” After he died I was told that he had left me all is photography equipment and that’s when I started working as a Motion Picture Stills Photographer. I always got work along side working with the studio.

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