Fandom

Camerapedia Wiki

Tanar lenses

5,980pages on
this wiki
Add New Page
Talk0 Share

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.

Tanaka Kōgaku made various Tanar lenses in Leica screw mount for its Tanack cameras, from the Tanack 35, IIIS and IV-S to the SD, V3 and VP. Some of these were also made in Nikon S and Contax mount. It seems that all the Tanar lenses have a straight helical, so that the front part of the barrel does not rotate when focusing.

Standard lenses Edit

The Tanar standard lenses were mostly sold as a set on a Tanack camera body.

Tanar 50mm f/3.5 and 5cm f/3.5 Edit

The Tanar 50mm f/3.5 and 5cm f/3.5 have a Tessar formula, with four elements in three groups.[1] Tests by the Tanaka company measured a resolution of 80 lines per mm at the centre, and 40 lines at the corners, at an unspecified aperture.[2]

Collapsible Tanar 50mm f/3.5 Edit

The early examples of the Tanar 50mm f/3.5 have an all chrome collapsible barrel. The focus ring is driven by a tab with infinity lock, and is graduated in feet. The aperture ring is on the side of the front part, and is graduated from 3.5 to 22. The front rim is engraved Tanaka Kogaku TANAR 1:3.5 F=50mm N°xxxxx. The overall finish seems rather poor.

The collapsible Tanar 50mm f/3.5 was the first lens available for the Tanack 35 camera. It appears in documents dated mid to late 1953.[3] The only serial number confirmed so far is 29080.[4]

Rigid Tanar 50mm f/3.5 Edit

The later Tanar 50mm f/3.5 have a rigid barrel, already available in March 1954.[5] The lenses made at the time of the Tanack 35 and Tanack IIIS still have 3.5ft minimum distance, and have a single row of mills on the focus ring and aperture ring. Serial numbers are known in the 29xxx range, from 29289 to 30197,[6] certainly continuing the sequence inaugurated with the collapsible version.

Close-focusing Tanar 50mm f/3.5 Edit

The close-focusing version was certainly made after the introduction of the Tanack IV-S in early 1955.[7] (At the period, the 50mm f/3.5 was available separately for ¥6,000.)[8]

The minimum distance is 1.5ft; the distances closer to 3.5ft are not coupled to the rangefinder, and the corresponding numbers are engraved in red on the distance scale. The barrel is accordingly modified, with a slightly higher base and a dual row of mills on the focus ring. The aperture ring moves in the reverse direction. The only serial number confirmed so far for the close-focusing version is 31006;[9] it is not known if there was a gap between the 29xxx and 31xxx numbers.

Chrome Tanar H.C. 5cm f/3.5 Edit

The Tanar H.C. 5cm f/3.5 is an updated version of the close-focusing 50mm f/3.5, retaining the same barrel. It differs by the black front bezel, engraved Tanaka Kogaku Japan TANAR H.C. 1:3.5 F=5cm N°xxxxx, with H.C. in red for Hard Coating. It is not known if the lens was effectively modified with a new form of coating, or if the change was cosmetic only. The first mention of hard coating in the documents is dated November 1955,[10] giving an approximate date for the introduction of this version. The only serial number confirmed so far is 31484, continuing the 31xxx sequence.[11]

The f/3.5 lens was available separately for ¥6,000 in Summer 1957.[12] Its sales at the time were certainly very low, most customers electing the f/2 or f/2.8 versions instead (the latter with only ¥1,600 premium). It seems that it was never made in black finish,[13] and its production was perhaps already stopped when this was adopted on other Tanar lenses. It was nonetheless still advertised in mid 1958,[14] but was apparently withdrawn from the catalogue shortly after.[15]

Tanar 50mm f/2.8 and 5cm f/2.8 Edit

The Tanar 50mm f/2.8 and 5cm f/2.8 also have a Tessar formula, with four elements in three groups.[1][16] Tests by Tanaka measured the same resolution as the f/3.5 lens.[17]

Rigid Tanar 50mm f/2.8 Edit

The Tanar 50mm f/2.8 was never made in collapsible mount. The early examples have an all chrome rigid barrel, focusing to 3.5ft, the same as for the rigid Tanar 50mm f/3.5. The aperture scale is engraved from 2.8 to 22, with an intermediate indication for 3.5. The front rim reads Tanaka Kogaku TANAR 1:2.8 F=50mm N°xxxxx.

The lens was released in Spring 1954 for the Tanack 35, and was also mounted on the IIIS. Serial numbers are known in the 45xxx, 46xxx, 52xxx and 87xxx range.[18]

Close-focusing Tanar 50mm f/2.8 Edit

The Tanar 50mm f/2.8 was modified with close focusing to 1.5ft, for the release of the Tanack IV-S. The modifications to the barrel are the same as on the 50mm f/3.5, which is physically the same. The aperture ring runs from 2.8 to 22 in the reverse direction, and no longer has the 3.5 indication. Serial numbers for this version are known in the 57xxx range, from 57200 to 57589,[19] and this lens is normally found on the very early Tanack IV-S.

Chrome Tanar H.C. 5cm f/2.8 Edit

The f/2.8 lens was updated as the Tanar H.C. 5cm f/2.8, certainly at the same time as the 5cm f/3.5. The barrel is the same and only the front bezel was altered, with Tanaka Kogaku Japan TANAR H.C. 1:3.5 F=5cm N°xxxxx on a black background. Serial numbers for the chrome version are known from 57862 to 58882;[20] this lens is normally found on early to mid-production Tanack IV-S. At least one example is known to have the distance scale in metres, an unusual feature on a Tanar lens.[21]

Black Tanar H.C. 5cm f/2.8 Edit

The f/2.8 lens received a new black and chrome finish, probably simultaneously with the f/2 lens, around early 1957. In mid 1957, the lens was available separately for ¥8,500.[22]

The lens tip, focus ring and barrel base are black, whereas the aperture ring, focus tab and screw mount remain chrome; the barrel parts themselves are unchanged. Serial numbers for this version are known from 59270 to 59692;[23] it is normally found on the late Tanack IV-S. At least one example has the distance scale in metres,[24] perhaps from the same small lot as the chrome example mentioned above.

Late Tanar 5cm f/2.8 Edit

The Tanar 5cm f/2.8 was modified for the introduction of the Tanack V3 in early 1959. It has a new barrel similar to that of the 5cm f/1.9, with an Exposure Value scale around the tip (see the description below). The bezel is engraved Tanaka Kogaku Japan TANAR 47.5° 1:2.8 F=5cm N°xxxxxx, with 47.5° in green, indicating the diagonal angle of view — the former H.C. engraving has disappeared. This version was produced in limited quantities, and the only serial number confirmed so far is 281966; the "28" prefix certainly corresponds to the maximum aperture.

Tanar 5cm f/2 Edit

The Tanar 5cm f/2 has a Sonnar formula, with six elements in three groups.[1] All the lenses have a rigid barrel. The focus ring has two rows of mills, and is driven by a tab with an infinity lock. The distance scale is engraved in feet down to 1.5ft, with all the distances closer than 3.5ft indicated in red. The aperture ring, at the front, is graduated from 2 to 16. The exact same lens was also supplied to Misuzu Kōgaku for the Alta, under the name Altanon.

It is likely that the close-focusing feature was first devised for that lens, which was strongly inspired by the Nikkor-H 5cm f/2 for the Nikon S, also focusing to 1.5ft. (The Steinheil Quinon 50mm f/2 is another example of Sonnar-type lens with close focusing, down to 0.6m.)

Tests by Tanaka measured a resolution of 70 lines per mm at the centre and 35 lines at the corners, at an unspecified aperture.[25] A comparative test of 35mm rangefinder cameras in Shashin Kōgyō October 1956 says that "whereas the Tanar 5cm f/2 is comparatively little known, the test pictures showed no practical difference with Nikkor or Canon lenses",[26] and a practical report by Nakafuji Atsushi (中藤敦) in Asahi Camera April 1957 says that the lens is surprisingly good.[27]

Chrome Tanar 5cm f/2 (prototype) Edit

Prototype Tanar 5cm f/2 lenses have the infinity position marked as INF instead of the ∞ symbol, and apparently lack the H.C. marking. One such lens is pictured on the Tanack IV-S no.68575 in the user manual of the camera, and in various original documents from mid 1955 onwards.[28] Its bezel is apparently engraved Tanaka Kogaku TANAR 1:2 F=5cm N°xxxxx, but the marking leaves plenty of spare space on the rim, and might have been retouched. The exact same body is pictured with an apparently different lens in advertisements dated early 1957;[29] the visible part of the bezel seems to read No.65002 TANAR 1:2.

Chrome Tanar H.C. 5cm f/2 Edit

The 5cm f/2 lens was modified for production with an ∞ symbol and a new marking at the front: Tanaka Kogaku Japan TANAR H.C. 1:2 F=5cm N°xxxxx. As for the f/3.5 and f/2.8 lenses, the addition of the red H.C. letters might indicate a new form of hard coating, or might be cosmetic only.

The first half of the production has an all chrome barrel. Serial numbers are confirmed from 22217 to 24444,[30] and this lens normally goes on the first version of the Tanack IV-S, with no film reminder.

Black Tanar H.C. 5cm f/2 Edit

The barrel received a black and chrome finish when the Tanack IV-S got a film reminder, around early 1957. The earliest document showing the black version is an advertisement dated May 1957; the pictured lens has no.24840.[31] In mid 1957, the f/2 lens was available separately for ¥8,500.[32]

Serial numbers for the black version are known up to 27594.[33] The total production of the 5cm f/2 lens can be estimated at more than 5,500 units, making it the most common of all the Tanar lenses. The lens was abandoned in early 1959, after the introduction of the Tanack V3, and was replaced by the 5cm f/1.9.[34]

Tanar 5cm f/1.9 Edit

The Tanar 5cm f/1.9 has six elements in three groups,[16] and is certainly another Sonnar design. It was developed specially for the Tanack V3, and it is the lens found most often on that camera.

The barrel is predominantly black, with a chrome tip and base mount. The focus ring has large knurls with chrome stripes. The distance scale is engraved both in metres and feet, down to 2ft or 0.6m. Distances higher than 3.5ft or 1m are in red for feet and in yellowish white for metres; the reverse applies to closer distances, which are not coupled to the rangefinder. The aperture scale goes from 1.9 to 22. There is a fixed Exposure Value scale engraved on the lens tip, along the aperture ring, from EV2 to EV18. It corresponds to a speed scale inscribed in green at the bottom of the ring, and indicates the proper shutter setting for the required exposure value. The front bezel is engraved Tanaka Kogaku Japan TANAR 47.5° 1:1.9 F=5cm N°xxxxxx, with 47.5° in green, indicating the diagonal angle of view.

Serial numbers are known in the 192xxx and 193xxx range, from 192073 to 193591.[35] The sequence of numbers certainly started at 192001, with "19" surely corresponding to the maximum aperture. The total production can be estimated at around 1600 units, about as much as the Tanack V3 bodies.

Tanar 5cm f/1.8 Edit

The Tanar 5cm f/1.8 is said to have a Sonnar design, with six elements in three groups.[36] The lens has Exposure Value readings on the tip, as on the 5cm f/2.8 and f/1.9 for the Tanack V3. The diaphragm has ten blades,[36] and the aperture scale goes from 1.8 to 22. The distance scale is engraved both in metres and feet. The front bezel is engraved Tanaka Kogaku Japan TANAR 1:1.8 f=5cm No.xxxxx.

It is said that the f/1.8 lens was specifically made for the Tanack VP, the last camera project by Tanaka before the company's failure.[37] The VP was never officially released, but a few examples of the camera and lens did reach the market around 1960.[37]

The first version of the lens has an all black focus ring with fine mills.[38] Two examples have been observed, including that pictured above.[39] These have been found alone, not paired with a camera body; one of them is currently mounted on a Tanack V3.

The second version has a knurled focus ring with chrome stripes. Two examples (no.82325 and 82426) have been observed on Tanack VP bodies.[40]

Tanar 5cm f/1.5 Edit

The Tanar H.C. 5cm f/1.5 has seven elements in three groups,[41] and uses high refractive index glass.[16] It was introduced in Spring 1957 for the Tanack SD, on which it was sold as the standard lens; it was perhaps also available alone.[42]

The lens has a rigid barrel, in predominantly black finish; only the base mount, focus tab and front part of the aperture ring are chrome. The focus ring has many knurls and a tab with infinity lock. The distance scale is engraved in white down to 3.5ft, and in orange red down to 2ft;[16][43] close focusing to 1.5ft was probably abandoned because of the lens larger size. The aperture scale goes from 1.5 to 16; the diaphragm has fifteen blades, and is perfectly round at all the apertures.[43] The front bezel is engraved Tanaka Kogaku Japan TANAR H.C. f:1.5 5cm N°xxxxx (with H.C. in red).

The serial numbers have five digits in the 15xxx range; "15" certainly corresponds to the maximum aperture. Lens no.15002 is pictured in original advertisements for the Tanack SD.[44] Other serial numbers are known up to 15334,[45] indicating a total production of less than 500 units, about the same as the Tanack SD body. The lens was still offered on the Tanack V3, but it seems that it was not updated for that camera.[46]

Tanar 50/1.2 Edit

The Tanar 50/1.2 is reportedly mentioned in very late advertisements for the Tanack SD, dated early 1959.[47] It is also mentioned in an article on the Tanack V3 dated March of the same year, but the lens is described as a special high aperture lens, not offered as a standard lens for the V3.[16] No picture of that lens has yet been observed, and no surviving example has been reported.

Other focal lengths Edit

Summary Edit

The first non-standard Tanar lenses were the W Tanar 35mm f/3.5 and Tele-Tanar 13.5cm f/3.5, announced in late 1955 in chrome finish; 85/2 and 100/3.5 lenses were announced at the same period but not immediately released.

It seems that the serial production of the 13.5cm f/3.5 did not start before late 1956, with the introduction of black and chrome finish. From that time, the chrome 35mm f/3.5 was gradually replaced by a black and chrome 35mm f/2.8. The 35mm f/2.8 and 13.5cm f/3.5 were offered in Nikon and Contax mount, in addition to Leica mount.

Various documents indicate that a 10cm f/3.5 was effectively offered from 1957, but it was certainly made in limited quantities only. The 85/2 was announced again in 1958, along with a 135/2.8, but these were certainly never sold. One recent source mentions a 28/2.8, but this is perhaps a mistake.[48]

W Tanar 35mm f/3.5 Edit

The W Tanar 35mm f/3.5, with five elements in two groups,[49] was announced in Autumn 1955. It first appears in the October special issue of Photo Art along with the 135/3.5, but no price is given.[50] It is pictured in the November issue of Shashin Kōgyō, and the price is announced as ¥13,800.[51] Its production was certainly stopped before the other Tanar lenses switched to a black finish,[52] around early 1957, and it was replaced by the 35mm f/2.8. It appears in the advertisements for the Tanack IV-S until April 1957,[53][54] then again from February to June 1958 after a long gap,[55] perhaps to clear the stocks.

The W Tanar 35mm f/3.5 always has an all chrome barrel, and was only made in Leica mount. The focus ring has eighteen knurls, and has an additional tab with infinity lock. The distance scale is engraved in feet down to 3.5ft. The aperture ring has fine mills and is graduated from 3.5 to 16. The front bezel is black, and the marking is W TANAR 35mm f:3.5 Tanaka Kogaku Japan No.xxxxx (with a red W).

Serial numbers are known from 35002 to 35293;[56] the sequence certainly started at 35001, and the "35" prefix certainly corresponds to the focal length. Total production can be estimated at about 300 units.

W Tanar 35mm f/2.8 Edit

In Leica mount Edit

The W Tanar 35mm f/2.8, with six elements in four groups,[57] was offered as a new product in late 1956, at ¥15,800,[58] and certainly remained in production until the end of the Tanack cameras.[59]

The W Tanar 35mm f/2.8 in Leica mount always has a black and chrome barrel: the focus and aperture rings are black, and the lens tip, focus tab and barrel base are chrome. The barrel is physically very similar to that of the 35mm f/3.5: the focus ring and focus tab are the same, and only the aperture ring differs, with many small knurls. The aperture scale goes from 2.8 to 22. The front bezel is inscribed either W TANAR 35mm f:2.8 Tanaka Kogaku Japan No.xxxxxx or W TANACK 35mm f:2.8 Tanaka Kogaku Japan No.xxxxxx(with W always in red).

Serial numbers are known from 283579 to 284470;[60] the sequence plausibly started at 283501, with "2835" indicating the lens features (2.8/35).

In Nikon or Contax mount Edit

The W Tanar 35mm f/2.8 was also made in Nikon S or Contax mount. The difference in the rangefinder adjustment between the two camera families in not critical for wide angle lenses, and the same lenses were sold indifferently for both mounts. The 35mm f/2.8 lens was only listed in Leica mount in a Japanese magazine dated Summer 1957;[61] the Nikon mount version was perhaps released later or made for export only.

The barrel differs from that of the Leica mount version. The focus ring and lens tip are black, whereas the aperture ring and base mount are chrome. The focus ring has a row of fine mills and no focus tab. It rotates in the reverse direction when compared to the Leica mount lenses, adopting the same ergonomy as official Contax or Nikon lenses. The distance scale is engraved in feet down to 3ft. The aperture ring has fine mills too, and goes from 2.8 to 22. The inscription on the front bezel is the same as on the Leica mount version. Serial numbers are known from 58543 to 58705.[62] These numbers are curiously overlapping those for the chrome Tanar H.C. 5cm f/2.8; it is not known if duplicate numbers were used.

Tele-Tanar 13.5cm f/3.5 Edit

Chrome version (prototype) Edit

The Tele-Tanar 13.5cm f/3.5, with four elements in three groups.[63] was announced in Autumn 1955. It is mentioned together with the 35/3.5 in the October special issue of Photo Art, at ¥18,500,[64] and pictured in the November issue of Shashin Kōgyō.[65]

The original picture shows an all chrome barrel. The focus and aperture ring have a row of fine mills, also found at the base of the barrel. The distance scale is engraved in feet, and the aperture scale goes from 3.5 to 22. Depth-of-field indications go to f/16 only. No surviving example of the chrome version has been observed so far, and it is not known if the lens was commercially sold in that finish.

Black version Edit

The black and chrome version was certainly introduced in late 1956 or early 1957. The 13.5cm f/3.5 is listed in advertisements for the Tanack IV-S from November 1956, again at ¥18,500,[66] but no picture is provided until December 1957.[67] It was surely offered until the failure of the Tanaka company in late 1959.[68]

The barrel is physically similar to the chrome version; only the milled parts and the mount itself are chrome, and the rest of the lens is black. The close distance is 5ft, certainly the same as on the chrome lenses. The front marking is Tanaka Kogaku Japan TELE–TANAR C. f:3.5 13.5cm N°xxxxx (with a red C.). Serial numbers are known from 13702 to 16858;[69] the sequence maybe started at 13501, with "135" indicating the focal length, for a total production of less than 3,500 lenses.

In Nikon and Contax mounts Edit

The Tele-Tanar 13.5cm f/3.5 was also made in Nikon S and Contax mounts. These two versions only differ by the mount itself: the lenses for Contax have a small C at the rear side, and those for Nikon have a small N instead. Sellers easily misdescribe these lenses, and it is advised to ask for the presence of the C or N letter, which should not be confused with the red C. on the front bezel, for Coating. It has been reported that the Contax-mount lenses do not physically fit the Nikon bodies;[70] such cross fitting is pointless anyway because the lens will not focus properly.

The 13.5cm f/3.5 lens was only listed in Leica mount in a Japanese magazine dated Summer 1957;[71] the Nikon and Contax mount version were perhaps released later or made for export only. A Japanese article dated August 1958 briefly mentions the existence of Nikon and Contax-mount tele lenses by Tanaka, "well received even in foreign countries".[72]

The serial numbers are mixed with those of the Leica mount version. The earliest number found for the Nikon or Contax version is 15093;[73] this is compatible with a late release date in 1957 or 1958.

The early lenses for Nikon and Contax, in the 15xxx range, have a barrel which is very similar to that of the Leica mount version. The only significant differences are the direction of the focus ring, the depth-of-field indications to f/22, and the numbering on the distance scale. Later lenses in the 16xxx range have a slightly different barrel with small knurls instead of fine mills. This finish was not adopted on the regular Leica mount version, which kept the fine-milled barrel until the end.

Other lenses Edit

Tele-Tanar 85/2 Edit

The Tele-Tanar 85/2 is mentioned as "available soon" in an article dated November 1955 by Saitō Tomosaburō of the Tanaka company,[74] but nothing emerged in the following months. The project certainly continued for some time, and a 85/2 lens is pictured and listed in advertisements dated March to June 1958.[75] The documents give no price, and only say that the lens would be "available soon". No surviving example has been found yet, and the lens was probably never sold.

The only available picture shows a black and chrome finish, very similar to that of the 13.5cm f/3.5 in Leica mount: the base mount and the milled parts of the focus and aperture rings are chrome, whereas the rest of the lens is black. The lens is shorter and wider than the 13.5cm f/3.5, and is noticeably larger than the 10cm f/3.5 described below.

Tele-Tanar 10cm f/3.5 Edit

The Tele-Tanar 10cm f/3.5 is mentioned as "available soon" in the same November 1955 article as the 85/2,[76] but the lens was not released in the following months. It is mentioned in the announce of the Tanack SD in the June 1957 issue of Shashin Kōgyō, along with the 35mm f/2.8 and f/3.5 and 13.5cm f/3.5,[77] and it is listed in the Summer 1957 issue of the same magazine, as available for ¥18,500 in Leica mount only.[78]

The advertisements for Tanack cameras mention the lens from September 1957, and show a picture from December of the same year.[79] The lens is still listed in the July 1959 issue of Shashin Kōgyō,[80] and was perhaps offered until the failure of the Tanaka company in late 1959.

The lens barrel is black and chrome: the aperture ring and base mount are chrome, and the rest of the lens is black. The focus and aperture rings and the barrel base seem to have fine mills, and the lens looks somewhat similar to the 13.5cm f/3.5, except for the colour distribution and size. It seems that the aperture scale goes to f/22. The front bezel has a red C., as on the 13.5cm f/3.5. One of the pictures shows a serial number starting in "10", certainly reminding the focal length again.

The 10cm f/3.5 was probably sold in limited quantities only, and no surviving example has been observed yet.

Tele-Tanar 135/2.8 Edit

The Tele-Tanar 135/2.8 is pictured and listed in the same March to June 1958 advertisements as the 85/2.[75] The documents give the price of ¥20,000, only ¥1,500 more than the 13.5cm f/3.5.

The picture shows a black and chrome barrel again: the aperture ring, rear part of the focus ring and base mount are chrome, and the rest is black. The black part of the focus ring has fine knurls, as on the contemporary 5cm f/1.5 or 35mm f/2.8 lenses. There is a tripod thread at the base of the barrel, opposite the depth-of-field indications.

No surviving example has been observed yet, and that lens was perhaps never commercially sold. For the release of the Tanack V3 in early 1959, the company told that the 50mm rangefinder base was deemed sufficient for lenses up to 135/3.5, 105/2.5 and 85/1.5; this might indicate that the 135/2.8 was abandoned at the time.[81]

Accessories Edit

Finders Edit

The 35mm and 13.5cm lenses were supplied with an accessory finder. The 35mm finder is cylindrical, and has a black and chrome finish, engraved TANACK 35mm at the top. There is a distance ring at the rear, modifying the angle of the accessory shoe for manual parallax correction down to 3.5ft.

The 13.5cm finder is longer but otherwise very similar. It is engraved TANACK 13.5cm at the top, and the parallax correction ring goes down to 5ft.

Universal finders covering 35mm to 135mm were announced in advertisements dated early to mid 1958.[82] Two different models were offered: multifocal (正像式, as the Nikon Variframe) or zoom (変倍式, as the Nikon Varifocal); the zoom model inexplicably has a cheaper price tag at ¥5,000 versus ¥7,000. None of these has been observed yet, and it is not known if they were actually sold.

Hoods Edit

Hoods were maybe offered as an accessory for the standard lenses, but none has been observed yet, and no detail is known. It seems that no hoods were made for the 35mm lenses, perhaps because the recessed front element makes this unnecessary.

The 13.5cm f/3.5 lenses were supplied with a rather long hood, which has been observed in black finish only. It is engraved TANACK JAPAN and SERIES VI at the rear, and SERIES VI TANAR f:3.5 135mm on the side. It seems that the front part of the hood unscrews, perhaps allowing to insert Series VI filters.

Filters Edit

The Tanaka company perhaps made filters for the Tanar lenses. These are mentioned in a few advertisements dated late 1957, but absolutely no detail is known.[83]

Caps Edit

The front caps supplied with the Tanar lenses in Leica mount are embossed Tanack, and are either all chrome or all black, depending on the lens finish. It seems that those supplied with the lenses in Nikon or Contax mount are plain black, with no marking.

Cases Edit

The 35mm lenses in Leica mount were supplied in an oval brown leather case, containing the lens and finder side by side. It seems that those for the f/3.5 and f/2.8 lenses are identical, except for the inscription on the lid: Tanack WIDE–ANGLE TANAR LENS 35mm f:3.5 or f:2.8.

The 35mm f/2.8 lenses in Nikon mount have a different cylindrical black case, embossed W.TANAR 35mm f:2.8 at the top, presumably containing the accessory finder inside the lid.

The 13.5cm f/3.5 lenses, whatever the lens mount, have a cylindrical brown leather case, inscribed TELE–TANAR 135mm f:3.5 at the top. (Those for Leica may have an additional Tanack marking but this is unsure.) It contains the lens with the hood in the reversed position, and the finder in a small compartment inside the lid.

Notes Edit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Lens scheme in Saitō, p.349 of Shashin Kōgyō November 1955, reproduced here.
  2. Saitō, p.350 of Shashin Kōgyō November 1955.
  3. Advertisement in Ars Camera May 1953, reproduced in Kokusan kamera no rekishi, p.145, and column in the November 1953 special issue of Photo Art (no.58), p.86.
  4. Lens pictured in Awano, p.52 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.37, and in HPR, pp.293–4.
  5. Advertisement in Asahi Camera March 1954 reproduced in Kokusan kamera no rekishi, p.145.
  6. Lens no.29289 pictured in Awano, p.52 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.37. Lens no.30197 pictured on a Tanack IV-S among Leica copies at Cameras Downunder.
  7. Close focusing is mentioned in the column on the Tanack IV-S in Shashin Kōgyō July 1955, p.39, and the article by Saitō in Shashin Kōgyō November 1955, p.350, specifically says that all the standard lenses have the feature.
  8. Tables of interchangeable lenses in special issues of Photo Art: June 1955 (no.80), pp.78–9, and October 1955 (no.87), pp.66–7.
  9. Lens observed in an online auction.
  10. Saitō, p.349 of Shashin Kōgyō November 1955.
  11. Lens observed for sale at a dealer.
  12. Table of interchangeable lenses in Shashin Kōgyō Summer 1957, p.109.
  13. Advertisements in Asahi Camera December 1957, p.176, January 1958, p.116, and February 1958, p.193, show a picture of various Tanar lenses, including a chrome 5cm f/3.5 along with black 5cm f/2.8 and 5cm f/2.
  14. Advertisements in Asahi Camera June 1958, p.206.
  15. The advertisement reproduced in Hagiya, p.184 of Sekai no Raika renzu, certainly dated mid to late 1958, lists the f/2 and f/2.8 options only for the Tanack IV-S.
  16. 16.0 16.1 16.2 16.3 16.4 Saitō, p.249 of Shashin Kōgyō March 1959.
  17. Saitō, p.350 of Shashin Kōgyō November 1955.
  18. Lens no.45913, pictured in Awano, p.52 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.37, and in Sugiyama, item 3764; lens no.46450, pictured in Pont / Princelle, p.247; lens no.52093, pictured in Awano, p.52 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.37, and in HPR, p.295; lens no.52154, sold as lot no.389 of Westlicht auction no.15; lens no.87704, pictured in Awano, p.52 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.37, in Sugiyama, item 3765, and in HPR, p.296.
  19. Lens no.57200 sold in lot no.236 of Westlicht auction no.5; lens no.57589 sold in lot no.356 of Westlicht auction no.7.
  20. Lens no.57862 observed in an online auction; lens no.58882 sold in lot no.147 of the October 18, 2000 sale by Christies, and pictured in this page at Innovative Cameras.
  21. Lens no.58720 offered for sale by a dealer.
  22. Table of interchangeable lenses in Shashin Kōgyō Summer 1957, p.109.
  23. Lens no.59270 offered for sale by a dealer; lens no.59692 sold as lot no.310 of the September 2, 1993 sale by Christies (no picture of that lens has been observed, but it should correspond to the black and chrome version).
  24. Lens no.59270 offered for sale by a dealer.
  25. Saitō, p.350 of Shashin Kōgyō November 1955.
  26. Article in Shashin Kōgyō October 1956, p.269: このうちタナ50ミリF2は比較的なじみのうすいレンズであるが、試写の結果、ニッコール、キャノンレンズに比べて実用上に於いては差を見出すことは出来なかった.
  27. Article in Asahi Camera April 1957, p.203: しかし被写体の動きが期待以上に描写されているので、自分ながら驚いている。いくぶんフレアーもあるが、他の高級レンズに勝るとも劣らない描写力と味をもっている。暗部の調子も思ったより出ている。
  28. Pictures in Shashin Kōgyō July 1955 (p.39), September 1955 (p.183) and November 1955 (pp.348 and 350), in the October 1955 special issue of Photo Art (no.87), p.78, and in the camera's user manual reproduced in this page by Patrick Badaire and in this page by Stephen @ Lee.
  29. Pictures in Shashin Kōgyō February 1957 (advertisement on p.86), March 1957 (advertisement on p.166) and April 1957 (advertisement on p.250).
  30. Lens no.22217 sold at auction by Auction Team Breker; lens no.24444 sold as lot no.15 of the July 4, 2006 sale by Christies.
  31. Advertisements in Shashin Kōgyō May 1957, p.334, and in Asahi Camera May 1957, p.165.
  32. Table of interchangeable lenses in Shashin Kōgyō Summer 1957, p.109.
  33. Lens no.27594 sold in lot no.337 of Westlicht auction no.12.
  34. Saitō, p.249 of Shashin Kōgyō March 1959, mentions the lens but says that very few were still produced, and that it was not updated for the Tanack V3.
  35. Lens no.192073 pictured in Awano, p.54 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.37, and in Sugiyama, item 3769; lens no.193591 reported in lot no.393 of the June 12, 1997 sale by Christies.
  36. 36.0 36.1 Teranishi, p.27 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.45.
  37. 37.0 37.1 Teranishi, p.26 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.45.
  38. Lens pictured in this page at Fukagawa Seimitsu Kōbō.
  39. The other example is pictured in this page at Fukagawa Seimitsu Kōbō.
  40. Lens no.82325 pictured in Teranishi, pp.26–7 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.45, and in this page of Nagoya's Camera Club; lens no.82426 pictured in Awano, p.54 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.37, in Sugiyama, item 3770, in HPR, p.303.
  41. Table of interchangeable lenses in Shashin Kōgyō Summer 1957, p.109, and article by Saitō, p.249 of Shashin Kōgyō March 1959. The presence of seven elements is also mentioned in various advertisements for the Tanack SD.
  42. The price is mentioned as "not fixed" in the table of interchangeable lenses in Shashin Kōgyō Summer 1957, p.109, apparently meaning that it was at least planned to sell the lens alone.
  43. 43.0 43.1 Hattori, p.25 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.45.
  44. Advertisements in Shashin Kōgyō August 1957 (p.174), September 1957 (p.258) and October 1957 (p.342).
  45. Lens no.15334 observed in an online auction.
  46. Saitō, p.249 of Shashin Kōgyō March 1959, mentions the lens as one of the three standard lenses of the Tanack V3, but describes the new barrel with Exposure Value scale for the 5cm f/2.8 and f/1.9 only.
  47. Kokusan kamera no rekishi, p.389 (item 1337).
  48. HPR, p.413.
  49. Table of interchangeable lenses in Shashin Kōgyō Summer 1957, p.109. The presence of five elements is confirmed by the announce in Shashin Kōgyō November 1955, p.331.
  50. Column in the October 1955 special issue of Photo Art (no.87), p.78, and table of interchangeable lenses in the same magazine, pp.66–7.
  51. Column in Shashin Kōgyō November 1955, pp.331–3.
  52. An all chrome 35mm f/3.5 is pictured among various black and chrome lenses in the advertisements in Asahi Camera December 1957, p.176, January 1958, p.116, February 1958, p.193, March 1958, p.202, April 1958, p.224, and June 1958, p.206.
  53. Advertisements in Shashin Kōgyō January 1957, p.6, February 1957, p.86, March 1957, p.164, and April 1957, p.250.
  54. Advertisements in Asahi Camera January 1957, p.208, February 1957, p.74, March 1957, p.190, and April 1957, p.185.
  55. Advertisements in Asahi Camera February 1958, p.193, March 1958, p.202, April 1958, p.224, and June 1958, p.206. The 35mm f/2.8 is the only wide angle lens listed in the advertisements in Shashin Kōgyō and Asahi Camera from May 1957 to January 1958.
  56. Lens no.35002 pictured in Kawamura, p.22 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.45; lens no.35293 sold as lot no.293 of LP Foto auction no.16.
  57. Table of interchangeable lenses in Shashin Kōgyō Summer 1957, p.109.
  58. Advertisement in Shashin Kōgyō November 1956, p.325; advertisement in Asahi Camera December 1956 reproduced in Kokusan kamera no rekishi, p.146.
  59. It appears in the advertisements in Asahi Camera up to June 1958 and perhaps later.
  60. Lens no.283579 sold as lot no.374 of Westlicht auction no.11; lens no.284468 sold in lot no.44 of the June 8, 1995 sale by Christies.
  61. Table of interchangeable lenses in Shashin Kōgyō Summer 1957, p.109.
  62. Lenses no.58543 and no.58705 offered for sale by a dealer.
  63. Table of interchangeable lenses in Shashin Kōgyō Summer 1957, p.109. The presence of four elements is confirmed by the announce in Shashin Kōgyō November 1955, p.331.
  64. Column in the October 1955 special issue of Photo Art (no.87), p.78, and table of interchangeable lenses in the same magazine, pp.66–7.
  65. Column in Shashin Kōgyō November 1955, pp.331–3.
  66. Advertisement in Shashin Kōgyō November 1956, p.325; advertisement in Asahi Camera December 1956 reproduced in Kokusan kamera no rekishi, p.146.
  67. Advertisement in Asahi Camera December 1957, p.176, showing a picture of the black and chrome 13.5cm.
  68. The 13.5cm f/3.5 notably appears in a table of available tele lenses in Shashin Kōgyō July 1959, p.54.
  69. Lens no.13702 offered for sale by a dealer; lens no.16858 sold in lot no.147 of the October 18, 2000 auction by Christies.
  70. Post by Brian Sweeney in Rangefinderforum.com.
  71. Table of interchangeable lenses in Shashin Kōgyō Summer 1957, p.109.
  72. Kitano, p.189 of Shashin Kōgyō August 1958, on the Tanack SD: コンタックスマウント、ニコンマウントなどの望遠、標準の各種レンズがあり、海外でも好評らしい. The vague allusion to standard lenses in Nikon and Contax mount seems to be a mistake.
  73. Lens offered for sale by a dealer.
  74. Saitō, p.349 of Shashin Kōgyō November 1955.
  75. 75.0 75.1 Advertisements in Asahi Camera March 1958, p.202, April 1958, p.224, and June 1958, p.206. See also the advertisement reproduced in Hagiya, p.184 of Sekai no Raika renzu, dated about late 1958.
  76. Saitō, p.349 of Shashin Kōgyō November 1955.
  77. Column in Shashin Kōgyō June 1957, p.524.
  78. Table of interchangeable lenses in Shashin Kōgyō Summer 1957, p.109.
  79. Advertisements in Asahi Camera December 1957, p.176, January 1958, p.116, February 1958, p.193, March 1958, p.202, April 1958, p.224, and June 1958, p.206.
  80. Table of available tele lenses in Shashin Kōgyō July 1959, p.54.
  81. Saitō, p.249 of Shashin Kōgyō March 1959.
  82. Advertisements in Asahi Camera February 1958, p.193, March 1958, p.202, April 1958, p.224, June 1958, p.206.
  83. Advertisements in Asahi Camera October 1957, p.195, and November 1957, p.113.

Bibliography Edit

Original documents Edit

  • Asahi Camera. Advertisements by Tanack Camera:
    • January 1957, p.208;
    • February 1957, p.74;
    • March 1957, p.190;
    • April 1957, p.185;
    • May 1957, p.165;
    • June 1957, p.114;
    • July 1957, p.124;
    • July–August 1957, p.172;
    • August 1957, p.110;
    • September 1957, p.106;
    • October 1957, p.195;
    • November 1957, p.113;
    • December 1957, p.176;
    • January 1958, p.116;
    • February 1958, p.193;
    • March 1958, p.202;
    • April 1958, p.224;
    • June 1958, p.206.
  • Kitano Kunio (北野邦雄). "Atarashii kamera: Tanakku SD" (新しいカメラ・タナックSD, Testing new cameras: Tanack SD). In Shashin Kōgyō no.76, August 1958. Pp.188–9.
  • Nakafuji Atsushi (中藤敦). "Kokusan kamera shiyō-ki: Tanakku IVS" (国産カメラ使用記・タナックIVS, Using Japanese cameras: the Tanack IV-S). In Asahi Camera April 1957. Pp.77 and 203.
  • Photo Art rinji zōkan: Zoku kamera no chishiki (フォトアート臨時増刊・続・カメラの知識, Photo Art special issue: Knowledge of cameras, continued). November 1953, no.58 of the magazine. "Kamera gyararī: Naigai kamera 200-shu tenbō" (カメラギャラリー・内外カメラ200種展望, Camera gallery: panorama of 200 Japanese and foreign cameras). P.86.
  • Photo Art rinji zōkan: Kamera akusesarī zensho (フォトアート臨時増刊・カメラアクセサリー全書, Photo Art special issue: All the camera accessories). June 1955, no.80 of the magazine. "Naigai kōkan renzu sōran" (内外交換レンズ総覧, Table and Japanese and foreign interchangeable lenses). Pp.78–9.
  • Photo Art rinji zōkan: Kamera no chishiki (フォトアート臨時増刊・カメラの知識, Photo Art special issue: Knowledge of cameras). October 1955, no.87 of the magazine.
    • "Kokusan kamera no saiten 1. 35-miri kamera" (国産カメラの祭典・1・35ミリカメラ, Japanese camera festival 1, 35mm cameras). P.78.
    • "Naigai hyōjun renzu oyobi kōkan renzu ichiranpyō" (内外標準レンズ及び交換レンズ一覧表, Table of Japanese and foreign standard and interchangeable lenses). Pp.66–7.
  • Saitō Tomosaburō (齋藤友三郎), of the Tanaka Kōgaku company. "Tanakku IVS-gata no kaisetsu" (タナックIVS型の解説, Comments on the Tanack IV-S). In Shashin Kōgyō no.41, November 1955. Pp.348–51.
  • Saitō Tomosaburō (齋藤友三郎), of the Tanaka Kōgaku company. "Tanakku V3 no kikō to tokuchō" (タナックV3の機構と特徴, Mechanism and characteristics of the Tanack V3). In Shashin Kōgyō no.83, March 1959. Pp.248–9.
  • Shashin Kōgyō. Advertisements by Tanaka Kōgaku:
    • no.54, November 1956, p.325;
    • no.56, January 1957, p.6;
    • no.57, February 1957, p.86;
    • no.58, March 1957, p.164;
    • no.59, April 1957, p.250;
    • no.60, May 1957, p.334;
    • no.61, June 1957, p.459;
    • no.62, July 1957, p.7;
    • no.63, Summer 1957, p.90;
    • no.64, August 1957, p.174;
    • no.65, September 1957, p.258;
    • no.66, October 1957, p.342.
  • Shashin Kōgyō no.37, July 1955. "Kokusan 35-miri kamera sōran" (国産35ミリカメラ総らん, Panorama of Japanese 35mm cameras). P.39.
  • Shashin Kōgyō no.39, September 1955. "Nyūsu furashu" (ニュースフラシュ, News flash). Pp.183–4.
  • Shashin Kōgyō no.41, November 1955. "Nyūsu furashu" (ニュースフラシュ, News flash). Pp.331–3.
  • Shashin Kōgyō no.52, September 1956. "Kokusan kamera memo" (国産カメラメモ, Memo of Japanese cameras). P.217.
  • Shashin Kōgyō no.53, October 1956. "Renzu kōkan-gata kamera go-shu o kentō suru" (レンズ交換型カメラ五種を検討する, Inspecting five cameras with interchangeable lens). Pp.265–9.
  • Shashin Kōgyō no.61, June 1957. "News flash". P.524.
  • Shashin Kōgyō no.63, Summer 1957.
    • "Nihon no kamera zenbō: 35-miri kamera" (日本のカメラ全貌・35ミリカメラ, Compendium of Japanese cameras: 35mm cameras). P.107.
    • "Nihon no kamera zenbō: Kōkan renzu ichiran" (日本のカメラ全貌・交換レンズ一らん, Compendium of Japanese cameras: Table of interchangeable lenses). Pp.108–9.
  • Shashin Kōgyō no.87, July 1959. "Kokusan bōen renzu ichiran-hyō" (国産望遠レンズ一覧表, Table of Japanese tele lenses). P.54.
  • Tanaka Optical Co., Ltd. Tanack Type IVS with "Tanar" lens, Direction for using. User manual of the Tanack IV-S. Reproduced in this page by Patrick Badaire and in this page by Stephen @ Lee.

Recent sources Edit

Links Edit

For the standard lenses, see also the links in the pages on Tanack bodies: Tanack 35 to IV-S, Tanack SD and Tanack V3 and VP.

In English:

  • Past sales by Westlicht:
    • W Tanar 35mm f/2.8 for Leica: lot no.374 of auction no.11 (May 26, 2007)
    • W Tanar 35mm f/2.8 for Nikon: lot no.510 of auction no.9 (May 20, 2006)
    • Tanar H.C. 5cm f/2 for Leica: lot no.375 of auction no.15 (May 23, 2009)
    • Tele-Tanar 13.5cm f/3.5 for Leica, among other lenses: lot no.376 of auction no.11 (May 26, 2007)
    • Tele-Tanar 13.5cm f/3.5 for Leica, among other lenses: lot no.299 of auction no.13 (June 7, 2008)
    • Tele-Tanar 13.5cm f/3.5 for Nikon: lot no.268 of auction no.4 (November 22, 2003)
  • Past sales by Christies (with pictures):
    • W Tanar 35mm f/2.8 and Tele-Tanar 13.5cm f/3.5 for Leica: lot no.147 of the October 18, 2000 sale
  • Past sales by LP Foto:
    • W Tanar 35mm f/3.5 for Leica: lot no.293 of auction no.16 (Sep. 8, 2002)
    • Tele-Tanar 13.5cm f/3.5 for Leica: lot no.294 of auction no.16 (Sep. 8, 2002)
    • Tanack 35mm finder: lot no.458 of auction no.17 (Dec. 8, 2002)
    • Tanack 13.5cm finder in lot no.584 of auction no.32 (Mar. 15, 2009)
  • Tele-Tanar 13.5cm f/3.5 for Leica in lot no.786 of the May 20, 2006 auction by Auction Team Breker
  • Tele-Tanar 13.5cm f/3.5 for Leica in lot no.5 of the May 6, 2006 auction by Tamarkin

In Japanese:

stock images UK

M39
b
o
d
i
e
s
(at) Wica
(de) Leica I (A) | Leica I (C) | Leica II (D) | Leica Standard (E) | Leica III (F) | Leica 250 Reporter | Leica IIIa (G) | Leica IIIb | Leica IIIc | Leica Ic | Leica IIIf | Leica IIIg
(ja)  Alta | Baika | Bessa L/T/R | Canon II/III/IV | Canon VT | Canon VIT | Canon P | Canon 7 | Canon 7s | Chiyoca | Chiyotax | Gokoku | Honor S1 | Honor SLIchicon-35 | Jeicy | Konica FR | Lausar | Leotax | Leotax G | Melcon | Melcon II | Muley | Nicca | Nicca III-L | Nippon | Tanack 35/IIIS/IV-S | Tanack SD | Tanack VP | Teica | Yasuhara T981
(uk) Periflex | Reid
(ussr) FED | Zorki | MIR | Drug | Leningrad
M39
l
e
n
s
e
s
(de) Astro Berlin | Enna | Hensoldt | Isco | Meyer | Rodenstock | Schacht | Schneider | Steinheil | Voigtländer | Zeiss
(ja) Arco (Colinar, Snowva) | Canon (Serenar) | Fuji (Cristar, Fujinon) | K.O.L. (Xebec) | Konica (Hexanon) | Konishiroku (Hexar, Hexanon) | Kowa (Prominar)Kyōei (Acall) | Lena | Leotax | Chiyoda / Minolta (Rokkor) | Misuzu (Altanon) | MS Optical R&D | Nicca | Nippon Kōgaku (Nikkor) | Olympus (Zuiko)Orion (Supreme) | Pentax | Reise | Ricoh | Sankyō (Komura) | Shōwa Kōki (Piotar) | Sun (Sola, Sophia, Xebec) | Tanaka (Tanar) | Telesar | Tōkyō Kōgaku (Simlar, Topcor) | Voigtländer | Y.K. Optical (Kobalux, Avenon) | Zeika (Rojar) | Zuihō (Honor) | Teikoku / Zunow
(fr) Angénieux | Berthiot
(uk) Corfield | Dallmeyer | National Opt. Co. | Pam | Ross | Taylor, Taylor & Hobson
(it) Elionar | Koritska | Kristall | Trixar | Wega
(nl) Old Delft
(us) Bausch & Lomb | Kodak

Also on Fandom

Random Wiki