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Konishiroku lenses in Leica screw mount

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Konishiroku (predecessor of Konica) made three standard lenses in Leica screw mount in the 1950s. In the 1990s, before the introduction of the Hexar RF, Konica made other lenses for the same mount: see Konica lenses in Leica screw mount.

Commercially produced lenses Edit

Announced in 1954 Edit

In October 1954, Konishiroku exhibited various products that were under development in three department stores in Tokyo; among them were four different lenses in Leica screw mount.[1] These included two Hexanon standard lenses: a 60mm f/1.2 and a 50mm f/1.9.[2] The following year, the company released a range of three standard lenses: first a 50mm f/3.5 Hexar in collapsible mount, then the two Hexanon.

Hexar 50mm f/3.5, collapsible Edit

The Hexar 50mm f/3.5 lens has a Tessar-like formula, of four elements in three groups. The same lens was mounted on the Konica I and IIB at the same period. The version in Leica screw mount normally has a all-chrome collapsible barrel, obviously inspired by the Leitz Elmar 5cm f/3.5. There are red arrows on the collapsible tube, indicating the direction of the lock movement. The aperture scale is on the side of the front part, graduated from 3.5 to 22, and the diaphragm is positioned behind the second lens element. Focus is driven by a tab with an infinity lock. The focusing scale is engraved in feet, from ∞ to 3.5ft, and the actual minimum distance is reported as 3.3ft.[3] The filter diameter is 34.5mm.[4] The Hexar front cap is made of black plastic. The lens was supplied in a yellow and black box, marked HEXAR, F3.5 50m/m FOR LEICA and KONISHIROKU.

The lens was adopted as a standard lens for the Chiyotax IIIF in Summer 1955,[5] and on the Honor released in mid-1956.[6] It was also offered on the Melcon from its release in September 1955, as a cheaper alternative to the Nikkor-H 5cm f/2, certainly for lack of an equivalent lens in the Nikkor range.[7] It was also offered on some versions of the Leotax,[8] and reportedly on the Nicca as well.[9] It was also available alone from the Shōwa Kōgaku company which made the Leotax, for ¥11,000;[10] it seems that Konishiroku did not distribute the lens to the general public itself.[11]

Lens numbers have seven digits and are known from the 1311xxx to the 1322xxx range.[12] It is not known if these numbers form a continuous sequence or are mixed with numbers for other lenses.

Hexanon 50mm f/1.9 Edit

The Hexanon 50mm f/1.9 has six elements in five groups. The all chrome rigid barrel has a large focusing ring, graduated in feet from ∞ to 3.5ft, and driven by a tab with an infinity lock. The actual minimum distance is reported as 3.3ft.[13] The aperture ring, at the front, is graduated from 1.9 to 22, and drives a ten-blade diaphragm. Corresponding depth-of-field indications are reported at the rear, with a red R index for use with infrared film. The filter diameter is 40.5mm.[14] The lens was supplied with a metal Hexanon front cap and a metal rear cap.

The Hexanon 50mm f/1.9 lens in Leica mount was displayed in the October 1954 exhibit mentioned above, together with a version mounted on a prototype interchangeable-lens Konica II. The lens was launched the next year; its price appears as "not fixed yet" (未定) in the October 1955 special issue of Photo Art,[15] and one recent source says that the actual release occurred in December.[16] In early 1956, the lens was announced as an alternative to the Hexar f/3.5 on the Chiyotax IIIF,[17] and on some versions of the Leotax.[18] It was available alone from Shōwa Kōgaku for ¥23,500;[19] it again seems that it was not sold directly by Konishiroku.[20] The 50mm f/1.9 was also fitted to the Honor from September 1957.[21]

A substantially similar 48mm f/2 Hexanon lens was mounted from early 1956 on the Konica IIA, and would continue on the Konica III and IIIA; it was replaced by a similar 50mm f/1.8 on the late IIIA and IIIM.

Lens numbers for the 50mm f/1.9 in Leica mount have seven digits and are known from the 3121xxx to the 3124xxx range.[22] The early examples of the lens have a different barrel, with a dual row of mills on the focusing ring, and different depth-of-field indications. One is perhaps a prototype, engraved in metres, with three rows of mills of an equal width (two on the focus ring and one on the aperture ring), and all the aperture positions engraved on the depth-of-field scale.[23] Another is perhaps typical of the early production, with a larger milled row on the aperture ring, and some numbers omitted from the depth-of-field scale.[24]

Hexanon 60mm f/1.2 Edit

The Hexanon 60mm f/1.2 has eight elements in six groups.[25] The rigid barrel is predominantly black, with the frontmost and rearmost rings in chrome. The focusing ring is graduated in feet from ∞ to 3.5ft, and has no infinity lock. The aperture ring is graduated from 1.2 to 16, with uneven spacing. There are depth-of-field indications on the rear of the focusing ring, with an R index for infrared. The words Made in Japan are engraved on the rear side of the lens barrel on at least some occasions.

The lens was supplied with a metal Hexanon front cap, a dedicated viewfinder, a shade, and three filters: UV, yellow and orange. The finder is black and chrome, engraved Hexanon f=60mm at the top. It has a rotating ring on the rear, with a scale from ∞ to 3.5, controlling the angle of the shoe mount for parallax correction. The hood is predominantly square, with a Konihood engraving at the top and a cut-out at the top left, certainly to clear the field of view of the rangefinder on most Leica and Leica copies. It is slipped on the lens outer rim, and held by a tightening screw. The filters have a black rim, engraved Konifilter and UV, YI or RI on the side. The whole outfit is held in a dedicated brown leather zipped case, embossed KONISHIROKU on the lid, with space to contain an extra film canister.[26]

The Hexanon 60mm f/1.2 lens was the highlight of the October 1954 exhibit. It was briefly mentioned in the January 1955 issue of Sankei Camera, in an article on wide-aperture lenses,[27] was listed in various magazines throughout the year,[28] and was reportedly released in December,[29] appearing as a new product in the January 1956 issue of Shashin Kōgyō.[30] It came after the wide-aperture offerings by Zunow (50mm f/1.1, 1953) or Fuji (50mm f/1.2, 1954). It was not sold as a standard lens on third party cameras, but directly by Konishiroku for ¥78,000.[31] In the US, it was available for $359.50, four times the price of a Konica II.[32]

Another Hexanon 60/1.2 lens was released in Leica screw mount in the second half of the 1990s, with a completely new formula and lens barrel: see Konica lenses in Leica screw mount.

Lens numbers for the original 60mm f/1.2 in Leica mount have seven digits in the 3360xxx range. It seems that very few were made, perhaps no more than 300.[33]

Bargain sale Edit

The three lenses were still offered at their original price in Summer 1957.[34] In the 1960s, after the sales of screw mount rangefinder cameras and lenses began to plummet, it is said that these three lenses were offered for a while at a vastly reduced price by the shop U Camera of Shinbashi, Tokyo, along with Fuji 50mm and 35mm lenses.[35] The Hexar 50mm f/3.5 was offered for ¥1,500 and the Hexanon 50mm f/1.9 was at ¥5,000, indeed a huge price cut.[35]

Experimental lenses Edit

Hexanon 50mm f/1.5 Edit

The Hexanon 50mm f/1.5 lens is known from a single picture in Kurashikku Kamera Senka, where it is said to have seven elements in five groups.[36] The barrel is all chrome, and looks slightly older than that of the early Hexanon 50mm f/1.9. The focusing ring is engraved in metres and is driven by a tab with an infinity stop. It has very fine mills in a single row, and the aperture ring has another similar row. This lens was probably tested in the first half of the 1950s, and was never put into production.

Hexanon 35mm f/2.5 and 135mm f/3.5 Edit

The Hexanon 35mm f/2.5 and Hexanon 135mm f/3.5, mainly known from pictures in Kurashikku Kamera Senka,[36] were perhaps the other two lenses exhibited in October 1954. Tables in the June and October 1955 special issues of Photo Art mention a Hexanon 35/3.5 in Leica mount, probably a mistake for the 35mm f/2.5.[37]

The 35mm f/2.5 is said to have six elements in five groups, and has an all chrome barrel with a focusing tab, quite similar to the 50mm f/1.9. The focusing scale is engraved in feet, the aperture scale goes from 2.5 to 22, and there is an index for infrared photography.

The 135mm f/3.5 has a black and chrome barrel, very similar to that of the 60mm f/1.2, except that the focusing ring has large knurls instead of the milled ring. The distance scale is in feet. The aperture scale goes from 3.5 to 32, and corresponding depth-of-field indications are engraved on the base of the barrel, in the black part.

Hexanon 50mm f/3.5, collapsible Edit

The Hexanon 50mm f/3.5 lens is known from a single example so far.[38] It is said to have five elements.[39] The lens barrel is almost the same as on the collapsible Hexar 50mm f/3.5, but the shape of the focusing tab and infinity lock is different, the focusing scale is engraved in metres, and depth-of-field indications are provided to f/16 only, despite the fact that the aperture scale goes all the way to f/22. The particular lens has serial number LB2025 – a non standard number which is a hint that the lens was experimental only. It is often pictured on an Ichicon-35, a Leica copy made by Daiichi Kōgaku and predating the Honor; its owner says that this was not the lens originally supplied with the camera.[40]

The tables in the June and October 1955 special issues of Photo Art (already cited above) mention a Hexanon 50/3.5, with the price mentioned as "not fixed yet" (未定) in October.[41] It is not known if this corresponds to the above Hexanon prototype, or if this is a mistake for the Hexar 50mm f/3.5 (which is absent from the tables).

Hexanon 50mm f/1.8, for the Konica FR Edit

The Hexanon 50mm f/1.8 lens in Leica screw mount was developed for the Konica FR prototype rangefinder camera, in 1960–61. The lens barrel and rangefinder coupling mechanism was designed by Yamada Yutaka (山田豊).[42]

The barrel is black with a chrome aperture ring. The focusing ring has a large row of knurls, and is engraved in feet from ∞ to 3.5ft, the actual minimum distance being perhaps 3.3ft.[43] The aperture scale goes from 1.8 to 22, and corresponding depth-of-field indications are displayed on the rear, together with an index for infrared photography. The front bezel is engraved in uppercase letters: HEXANON 1:1.8 f=50mm KONISHIROKU, in a style which was also found on the fixed lens of the Konica S 35mm camera. The filter attachment is 43mm diameter.[44] The dimensions are 49mm diameter and 43.5mm length, measured to the flange, and the weight is 185g.[45]

Two examples of the lens are known to survive today, with serial numbers 1234563 and 1234565.[46] The six first digits are certainly dummy, and the only meaningful digit seems to indicate that at least five units were made. Lens no.1234565 was property of the Konica company in the early 2000s,[47] and is perhaps still owned by Konica Minolta, or has been transferred to Sony.

Other lenses Edit

Early postwar lenses Edit

Konishiroku might have made a handful of lenses in Leica screw mount after the war. A Hexar Ser.1 15cm f/4.5 lens (no.3417) has been observed in an all chrome barrel, presumably for 35mm cameras, most probably in Leica screw mount.[48] The focal length in cm, the mention of Ser. 1 and the Konishiroku Tokyo engraving hint to the immediate postwar period. There are unconfirmed reports of a Hexar 150mm f/4.5, which might be different.[49]

Finally, a Tele-Hexar 40cm f/5.6 lens has been observed, reportedly in 39mm screw mount.[50] Such a focal length would have been usable on a reflex housing only, such as the early Visoflex. The barrel is black and chrome, and the lens head has a slightly different black finish. The engraving on the front bezel reads Tele–Hexar 1:5.6 f=40c.m, but it seems that the serial number and the mention of the manufacturer are lacking. Three holes are visible on the bezel, at the position of the pins used to attach filters on the Tele-Hexar 40cm f/5.6 lenses made for the SK-100 aerial camera. This suggests that the lens head was originally made as a military product, and was adapted to a civilian use only later.

Another Tele-Hexar 40cm f/5.6 is pictured in this page of Itoh Kenichiro's website, in 39mm screw mount for a Visoflex reflex housing. This lens has a cruder finish than the previous one, and was clearly adapted from an aerial lens for the SK-100.

Lenses adapted by Ōno Takashi Edit

A number of Hexar barrel lenses were modified with a focusing mount and a Leica screw mount by Ōno Takashi (大野隆司), who worked for Minolta's experimental department.[51] These have a mark on the rear of the mount, reading O–NO.[51] A converted Hexar 10.5cm f/4.5 modified by Ōno is known with a black lens head, engraved Rokuoh–sha Tokyo in the bezel, and a chrome focusing mount, including a large focus ring engraved in metres.[52]

Hexar 50mm f/3.5 enlarging lens, modified for the Chiyoca Edit

The Hexar 50mm f/3.5 found on the viewfinder-only Chiyoca model is a modified enlarging lens: the maker of the Chiyoca obtained various Hexar enlarging lenses and mounted them on a focusing helix they made themselves.[53] It is not known if this was made with the approval of Konishiroku or in a purely unofficial way. In any case, the Konishiroku company was not aggrieved, and later supplied official Hexar and Hexanon lenses for the Chiyotax.

Some sources say that the resulting lens has a rigid barrel, but it is actually collapsible on a short travel, with a polished chrome tube between the lens head and the focusing ring.[54]

It is said that the coupling cam is not properly adjusted for rangefinder Leica cameras or Leica copies, because the cam was simply cut without the fine adjustment needed by the subtle difference in focal length between that lens and a standard Leica lens.[55]

The finish of the lens is all chrome. The aperture ring is that of the original enlarging lens, with a scale on the side from 3.5 to 16. The focusing scale is engraved in feet, and there are depth-of-field indications for all apertures. These indications are vastly overrated; for example they indicate sharp pictures from about 7ft at f/16 when the lens is set at infinity, whereas a realistic value would be about 15ft.[56] Lens numbers are known in the 32xxx to 35xxx range; given the unofficial nature of the product, these are certainly not continuous.

List of lenses Edit

  • 35mm f/2.5 Hexanon, 6 elements in 5 groups, rigid, all chrome, focusing tab, experimental only
  • 50mm f/3.5 Hexar, 4 elements in 3 groups, collapsible, all chrome, focusing tab, ¥11,000
  • 50mm f/3.5 Hexar, 4 elements in 3 groups, all chrome, unofficial modified enlarging lens, on the viewfinder-only Chiyoca
  • 50mm f/3.5 Hexanon, collapsible, all chrome, focusing tab: experimental only
  • 50mm f/1.9 Hexanon, 6 elements in 5 groups, all chrome, focusing tab, ¥23,500
  • 50mm f/1.8 Hexanon, black and chrome, experimental only, for the Konica FR
  • 50mm f/1.5 Hexanon, 7 elements in 5 groups, all chrome, focusing tab, experimental only
  • 60mm f/1.2 Hexanon, 8 elements in 6 groups, black and chrome, ¥78,000
  • 75mm f/3.5 Hexanon, unconfirmed[49]
  • 135mm f/3.5 Hexanon, black and chrome, experimental only
  • 15cm f/4.5 Hexar Ser.1, all chrome, lens mount unconfirmed
  • 150mm f/4.5 Hexar, unconfirmed[49]
  • 40cm f/5.6 Tele-Hexar, maybe for a 39mm LTM reflex housing

Notes Edit

  1. Hagiya, p.130 of Sekai no Raika renzu.
  2. Hagiya, pp.130 and 186 of Sekai no Raika renzu.
  3. Minimum distance of 3.3ft: Hagiya, p.128 of Sekai no Raika renzu.
  4. Hagiya, p.128 of Sekai no Raika renzu.
  5. See the page on the Chiyoca and Chiyotax for the various sources. Hagiya, p.128 of Sekai no Raika renzu, says Spring 1955 for the release of the Hexar, but this is perhaps a bit early.
  6. See the page on the Honor S1 for the various sources.
  7. See the page on the Melcon for the sources.
  8. Advertisement in Asahi Camera March 1956, reproduced in Kokusan kamera no rekishi, p.324.
  9. Nicca: Hagiya, p.128 of Sekai no Raika renzu.
  10. Advertisement by Shōwa Kōgaku reproduced in Hagiya, p.185 of Sekai no Raika renzu.
  11. Hagiya, p.128 of Sekai no Raika renzu, says that the lens does not appear on Konishiroku advertisements.
  12. Lenses have been observed in all thousands from 1311xxx to 1322xxx. Lowest is 1311027 and highest is 1322927.
  13. Minimum distance of 3.3ft: Hagiya, p.130 of Sekai no Raika renzu.
  14. Hagiya, p.130 of Sekai no Raika renzu.
  15. Table of interchangeable lenses in the October 1955 special issue of Photo Art, pp.66–7. The lens is also listed in a similar table in the June 1955 special issue, pp.78–9.
  16. Miyazaki, p.169, says December 1955. Hagiya, p.130 of Sekai no Raika renzu, says Summer 1955 but this is certainly too early.
  17. Column in Shashin Kōgyō February 1956, p.101. See also the sources in the page on the Chiyoca and Chiyotax.
  18. Advertisement in Asahi Camera March 1956, reproduced in Kokusan kamera no rekishi, p.324.
  19. Advertisement by Shōwa Kōgaku reproduced in Hagiya, p.185 of Sekai no Raika renzu.
  20. Hagiya, p.130 of Sekai no Raika renzu, says that the lens does not appear on Konishiroku advertisements.
  21. See the page on the Honor S1 for the various sources.
  22. Lowest is 3121063 and highest is 3124549, with a large gap between 3121063 and 3122276.
  23. Lens pictured in Hishida, p.157 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.10.
  24. Lens no.3121063 sold on a Honor SL as lot no.357 of Westlicht auction no.7.
  25. Advertisement reproduced in Hagiya, p.187 of Sekai no Raika renzu. Eight elements are also mentioned in the English-language advertisement reproduced in this page at Photostream. Hishida, p.157 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.10, says seven elements in six groups, presumably by mistake.
  26. Extra film canister: caption in Miyazaki, p.170.
  27. Article in Sankei Camera January 1955, reproduced in Tamura, p.9 of Camera Collectors' News no.41.
  28. Tables of interchangeable lenses in special issues of Photo Art: June 1955, pp.78–9, and October 1955, pp.66–7. The latter says that the price was "not fixed yet" (未定).
  29. December 1955: Miyazaki, p.169.
  30. Column in Shashin Kōgyō January 1956, p.28.
  31. Price: Miyazaki, p.169.
  32. Advertisement reproduced in this page at Photostream.
  33. Lowest is 3360006, pictured in Hagiya, p.83 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.58. Highest is perhaps 33602x1, pictured in Miyazaki, p.170 (the number is hardly legible).
  34. Table of interchangeable lenses in Shashin Kōgyō Summer 1957, p.109.
  35. 35.0 35.1 Hagiya, p.129 of Sekai no Raika renzu.
  36. 36.0 36.1 Hishida, p.157 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.10.
  37. Tables of interchangeable lenses in special issues of Photo Art: June 1955, pp.78–9, and October 1955, pp.66–7.
  38. Example pictured in Awano, p.122 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.32, and on the Ichicon-35 in HPR, pp.185–6, and in Sugiyama, item 3277.
  39. Awano, p.122 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.32.
  40. Awano, p.2 of Camera Collectors' News no.37.
  41. Tables of interchangeable lenses in special issues of Photo Art: June 1955, pp.78–9, and October 1955, pp.66–7.
  42. Hagiya, p.80 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.58.
  43. Minimum distance of 3.3ft reported in Hagiya, p.82 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.58.
  44. Hagiya, p.82 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.58.
  45. Hagiya, p.82 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.58.
  46. Lens no.1234563 pictured in Hishida, p.82 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.10; lens no.1234565 pictured in Hagiya, pp.80–2 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.58. (Hagiya, p.82, says that no.1234565 is the only surviving lens, but the serial number 1234563 is clearly legible in the picture in Hishida's article.)
  47. Hagiya, p.82 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.58, says that it was stored in the Konica Plaza at Shinjuku, today the Konica Minolta Plaza.
  48. Lens pictured in this page at mflenses.com.
  49. 49.0 49.1 49.2 See the talk page.
  50. Lens sold in an online auction. The watermark on the pictures shows that this lens was sold by the same seller which sold the 15cm f/4.5 lens no.3417.
  51. 51.0 51.1 Awano, p.125 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.32.
  52. Example pictured in Awano, p.125 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.32.
  53. Sugiyama, item 3214, Awano, p.50 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.37, and this page by Nekosan.
  54. Compare the pictures of the lens in extended position in HPR, p.179 or in this page at Pacific Rim and in retracted position in the Christies auction catalogue dated June 8, 1995 (lot no.28). The lens is described as collapsible in Awano, p.50 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.37, and in McKeown, p.205; it is described as rigid in Pont / Princelle, p.190, in HPR, p.178, and in this page by Ian Norris.
  55. Awano, p.50 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.37.
  56. This is pointed out by Awano, p.50 of Kurashikku Kamera Senka no.37.

Bibliography Edit

Original documents Edit

  • Photo Art rinji zōkan: Kamera akusesarī zensho (フォトアート臨時増刊・カメラアクセサリー全書, Photo Art special issue: All the camera accessories). June 1955, no.80 of the magazine. "Naigai kōkan renzu sōran" (内外交換レンズ総覧, Table and Japanese and foreign interchangeable lenses). Pp.78–9.
  • Photo Art rinji zōkan: Kamera no chishiki (フォトアート臨時増刊・カメラの知識, Photo Art special issue: Knowledge of cameras). October 1955, no.87 of the magazine. "Naigai hyōjun renzu oyobi kōkan renzu ichiranpyō" (内外標準レンズ及び交換レンズ一覧表, Table of Japanese and foreign standard and interchangeable lenses). Pp.66–7.
  • Shashin Kōgyō no.43, January 1956. "News Flash". P.28.
  • Shashin Kōgyō no.44, February 1956. "News Flash". P.101.
  • Shashin Kōgyō no.45, March 1956. Cover picture, p.161.
  • Shashin Kōgyō no.63, Summer 1957. "Nihon no kamera zenbō: Kōkan renzu ichiran" (日本のカメラ全貌・交換レンズ一らん, Compendium of Japanese cameras: Table of interchangeable lenses). Pp.108–9.
  • Shashin Kōgyō no.65, September 1957. "News Flash". P.328.

Modern sources Edit

Links Edit

In English:

In Japanese:


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