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Kaitenkei

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Japanese subminiature on cine film (edit)
8mm film Camera "A" | Camera-Lite | Echo 8 | Kaitenkei
9.5mm film Doryu 1 | Fujica 8×11mm SLR | Yashica Atoron
16mm film Albert | Beauty 16 | Bell 16 | Bell Kamra | Binoca | Camera "B" | CM-16 | Cyclops | Dan 16 | Darling-16 | Doryu 2-16 | Fujica 16mm SLR | Gemmy | Glico Pistol | Konan-16 Automat | Mamiya 16 Automatic | Mica Automat | Micta | Minolta-16 | Minolta-16 EE | Minolta-16 MG | Minolta-16 MG-S | Minolta-16 P | Minolta-16 Ps | Minolta 16 QT | Mycro Super 16 | Mykro Fine Color 16 | Nice | Nikon 16 | Poppy | Ramera | Ricoh 16 | Ricoreo 16 | Rubina | Rubix | Seiki 16 | Seiki 16 (pistol) | Shaty 16 | Sonocon 16 | Spy 16 | Steky | Golden Steky | Teleca | Viscawide-16 | Yashica Y16 | Yashica 16 EE | Zany | Zuman Super 16 | Zunow Z16
unknown Matchbox camera
roll film and other film see Japanese roll film subminiature
110 film see Japanese 110 film

The Kaitenkei (回転計, meaning "revolution counter") is a Japanese spy camera made by Tōkyō Kōgaku in the late 1930s.

The camera was reportedly developed in 1937, on request from the Army Science Institute.[1] It is said that it was inspired by a contemporary German spy camera,[2] but the Kaitenkei resulted more expensive,[3] and only a few were made for that reason.[4]

The Kaitenkei is shaped as a matchbox, 32.5×24×15mm in size.[5] It reportedly takes ten exposures on 8mm cine film, has a 13.9mm f/2.8 lens and a guillotine shutter with a single speed setting (1/50).[6]

At least one Japanese matchbox camera is known to exist today; it is not known if it was related to the Kaitenkei.

Notes Edit

  1. Baird, p.71; Antonetto and Russo, p.23.
  2. Antonetto and Russo, p.195.
  3. Baird, p.71; Antonetto and Russo, p.23.
  4. Baird, p.71. Antonetto and Russo, p.23, say that the camera was not accepted by the Army.
  5. Baird, p.71.
  6. Baird, p.71; Antonetto and Russo, p.23.

Bibliography Edit

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